Home from Asheville, potatoes planted, more rain and cold weather.

Last night I got home from a very successful Mother Earth News Fair in Asheville, North Carolina. This location was new one for Mother Earth News, and attendance was higher than expected. On Sunday evening one of the staff told me there had been 7000-8000 people. That’s not official. The weather was perfect, and the setting beautifully backed by the mountains. I gave two presentations: Cold-hardy winter vegetables, and Crop rotations for vegetables and cover crops, which I revised for the occasion to be clearer, I hope! Tomorrow I’ll upload it to Slideshare.net, so attendees can watch again, and people who didn’t go can see it for the first time. I did a book-signing, and had a marketing talk with my publishers.

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I got home to find our garden crew had managed to seize the moment with dry enough soil and get the potatoes planted. It did involve an evening shift covering them. The beds had been prepared for planting broccoli and cabbage, but time ran out. Just as well, maybe. We now have the possibility of a night-time low temperature of 25F tonight and 26F tomorrow. The transplants are better off in the coldframe under several layers of covers.

I spent a lot of the day setting rooted sweet potato slips into flats.The link takes you to last spring’s blog post telling more about how we do it.  Ten days ago I was behind on my goal for the number of slips in flats. Today I am two weeks ahead, suddenly!

Cut sweet potato slips put in water to grow roots. Credit Kathryn Simmons

Cut sweet potato slips put in water to grow roots.
Credit Kathryn Simmons

Growing sweet potato slips in a germinating cabinet. Credit Kathryn Simmons

Growing sweet potato slips in a germinating cabinet. Credit Kathryn Simmons

Another piece of good news is that the glitch that sometimes made my website repeatedly unavailable has been solved!

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Home from Asheville, potatoes planted, more rain and cold weather.

  1. So glad the glitch has been resolved – now I can actually read your blog entries! LOVE your book – it’s so full of well-observed and useful detail. And yes, aren’t we having lovely weather? Best wishes from admirer Erica (more relevantly at groweat.blogspot.com). (I think we were in Craig LeHoullier’s class at Monticello together last Sept. – wish I’d known you to say hello!)

  2. Thanks Erica! Yes, I struggled around that website problem for too long before tackling it! Now it opens first time! Yes I was in Craig LeHoullier’s workshop at heritage Harvest Festival. He was a great source for knowing which are the best heirloom tomatoes. http://nctomatoman.weebly.com/ for anyone else reading this and interested!

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