Sweet potato harvests over the years

Crew harvesting sweet potatoes. Photo Wren Vile

 In my 10/30/20 post Growing High Yielding Sweet Potatoes, I wrote

When to harvest sweet potatoes

Unlike white potatoes, which have the annual plant sequence of vegetative growth, flowering and dying back, sweet potato plants would go on growing forever if the weather remained warm enough. Choose when to dig them up, ahead of cold weather. The longer you wait, the bigger the potatoes, but you are gambling with the weather. Usually sweet potatoes are harvested in the week that the first frost typically occurs in your region. I have written plenty already in previous years about harvesting, so I won’t go into it here. See one of the links to those posts, or my slideshow, if you want to know what comes next, or your climate is considerably colder than mine in central Virginia.

Today I looked to see the “plenty” I had written in previous years, and was surprised not to find much! Every mid-October from 2012 to 2016, I mentioned sweet potato harvest, but many times it has been in passing, and mostly yield statistics (bragging or groaning). 2012 has the most detail on doing the harvest – read it below.

In 2019 we got a very nice yield and carried on eating sweet potatoes into September. Previously people seemed to lose interest in sweet potatoes in late May, and we would distribute our surplus to other people. This year we just kept eating and enjoying them. I can report that they did get wrinkly and grow big sprouts, but were still very tasty down to the last one in late September.

We now use electric fencing to keep the deer out, and grow on biodegradable plastic mulch to keep the weeds down, and use drip irrigation to grow the sweet potatoes up. These developments in our method became necessary over the years.

Yesterday we ate sweet potato leaves as a seasonal green. You can eat these throughout the growing season, but we usually don’t, as we hesitate to take away anything that is helping the tubers grow. But at harvest time, the leaves are about to return to the soil, so we clipped the vine tips and cooked them up. OK, interesting, never going to be a favorite for me, but perfectly acceptable, and less distracting than going off to harvest somehting else to eat in the middle of the big sweet potato harvest!

Sweet potatoes ready to crate up.
Photo Nina Gentle

Sweet Potato Harvest October 2016

10/11/16: Yesterday we started harvesting our sweet potatoes. Yields look OK but not fantastic. We had a lot of problems with deer eating our sweet potatoes this year. We did have a temporary electric fence, but we often didn’t pay it good attention and it grounded out. Next year the rotation brings the sweet potatoes to a more traveled location. I can’t believe I’m already doing that “Gardener Survival Strategy” of thinking “Next Year Everything Will Be Perfect”!!

 10/18/16: Our average first frost date is October 14. Actually from our own records it has averaged 10/22 over the last 11 years. . . .  It’s good to be prepared.

This post includes tips on DIY weather-forecasting, and preparations for fall frosts

Sweet potatoes sorted into boxes.
Photo McCune Porter

 Sweet Potato Harvest 2015

 10/20/15: We got our sweet potatoes all dug and safely indoors before Saturday night’s 27F and Sunday night’s 26F. Whew! Another Garden Year Milestone passed. We got about 223 boxes this year. The boxes contain about 23lbs each, so that’s 5129 lbs, plenty to feed 100 hungry people for six or seven months. . . .  Our average harvest for this size patch (about 700 plants) is 4035lbs. This year we got a yield of a little over 7lbs of sweet potatoes per plant. Last year’s record crop was 11lbs per plant.

 10/13/15: We are on the point of harvesting our sweet potatoes. After all the rain we had recently, we were waiting for the soil to dry enough to walk on. . . . I was worried for a couple of days that the weather would stay cold and the sweet potatoes might rot in the cold wet soil. One year when I was fairly new to Virginia I caused us to leave the sweet potatoes in the ground till early November (hoping they would grow a bit more) and then it rained hard and we ended up with a load of sweet potatoes that either rotted directly or else went through a transition to a hard uncookable state. I learned the hard way to harvest sweet potatoes before soil drops to 55F. This week I studied the soil thermometer and the max and min thermometer and was reassured by the warm sunny days. The soil has been drying out nicely. Tomorrow we start digging. It usually takes us three afternoons. Everything looks auspicious. No rain or horribly cold weather, enough people. . .

Crates of sweet potatoes selected for growing next year’s slips.
Photo Nina Gentle

Sweet Potato Harvest 2014

10/14/14: Our sweet potato harvest is huge this year! We mostly managed to keep the deer out of the plot, by luck and a scarecrow and things that fluttered in the breeze. We’ve filled all our usual boxes and then scrambled twice to find more! . . . . I counted the equivalent of 273 normal-sized boxes in the basement this morning. At 23 pounds for our standard box, that’s about 6280 pounds. We might be up to 6500 pounds by the time we’re done. This will be our record! I think our local food pantry will be getting some sweet potatoes this winter and next spring!

I compared sweet potato yields for different years. We usually have about 600 plants in 800 row feet (16″ spacing). Yield is about 11 pounds/sweet potato plant this year. But as they say “your results may vary.”  Ours certainly have. Working back from 2012, we harvested 4070 lbs, 2208 lbs, 1860 lbs, “lots” (poor record-keeping!), 5590 lbs, 3820 lbs and 4050 lbs in 2007.

Hauling sweet potatoes uphill the hard way. Sometimes we use the truck!
Photo Nina Gentle

Sweet Potato Harvest 2013

10/13/13, Sweet potatoes, statistics and inspiration: After a week of drizzle, it finally eased up and we started harvesting our sweet potatoes. . . .  As usual, we set the dug roots in clusters, so we could see which plants yielded most and chose medium-sized roots from those to grow our slips next year. . . . This year, the Georgia Jet seem more productive than the Beauregard – I think that’s usual. We dug about a third of the crop the first day and got 86 boxes. The second day we had a lot of other harvesting (beans and broccoli being the most time-consuming), so we only dug another 36 boxes. . . .

Well  . . .  the yield dropped off a lot where the deer had been browsing (memo: fence out the deer in future!) We got a total of 177 boxes of various sizes, perhaps about 3939 pounds, almost two tons. . . .

Our yearly harvest of sweet potatoes has varied a lot, from 31 boxes (a sad year) to 243 in 2009. An average over ten years of 112 boxes, each weighing perhaps 23 pounds. . . .  We always hope to have enough to last till the beginning of May, when people start to lose interest in sweet potatoes, and start hoping for tomatoes.

Sweet potato harvest.
Photo Nina Gentle

How we do our Sweet Potato Harvest 2012

10/12/12: Usually sweet potatoes are harvested the week the first frost typically occurs. . . . Contrary to myth, there is no toxin that moves from frozen leaves down into the roots. On the other hand, cold injury can ruin the crop, and roots without leaf cover are exposed to cold air temperatures, and have lost their method of pulling water up out of the soil. Cold wet soil can quickly rot sweet potatoes (I know, it’s happened here).

To harvest, we first remove the vines from the area to be harvested that day. There is usually 3 afternoons’ digging for ours, and we want to leave live vines to protect the rest of the crop overnight. We use pruners to snip the vines where they emerge from the soil, leaving stumps to show where to dig. We roll the vines into the spaces between the rows.

Using digging forks, we carefully dig up the roots, which grow in the ground in a bunch-of-bananas shape. We want to select good potatoes for seed, and we grow several different kinds (Georgia Jet, Beauregard, and a couple of heritage varieties whose names we don’t know), so we make sure not to mix potatoes from different rows. As we dig, we set the potatoes out beside the spot where they’ve grown, one clump per plant, so it’s easy to identify the most productive plants.

It’s important not to bruise the roots, or to leave them exposed to temperatures higher than 90°F (32°C) for more than half an hour, or they will get sun-scald. Below 55°F (13°C), they’ll get chilling injury. We also avoid any abrasion of the skin, which is very fragile at this stage. We leave the sweet potatoes to dry on the ground for 1-2 hours, unless the weather is unsuitable. This year we had ideal weather, not too hot, not too cold, breezy enough to dry the skins, sunny.

We want to grow our own slips (baby plants) next year, so we save at least 1 root per 5 slips wanted.  (1 good slip every 16″.) So to plant 800 row feet, (600 slips), we save 100 each of our two main varieties and 20 each of the two heirlooms. That should be plenty. Some will shrivel or rot, so we allow a margin. We don’t save for seed any roots that look diseased. We choose plants with a high yield and no string (rat-tail) roots. From these plants, we choose small-medium sized potatoes with typical shape and color.

When grading and crating the roots in the field, we first choose the seed potatoes, and then sort storable from “Use First” roots. Large open broken surfaces will cure and can be stored, but any roots with soft wet damaged areas or deep holes (whether from voles, bugs or fork tines) will not store, and should be graded out, for composting or immediate use. We sort into 4″ deep wood flats or 5″ plastic crates for curing, and buckets for the “Use First” category.

Boxes of sweet potatoes curing.
Photo Nina Gentle

Immediately after harvest, we take the boxes of sweet potatoes into a warm damp basement below the dining hall, to cure. This allows the skin to thicken, cuts to heal over and some of the starches to convert to sugars. Uncured “green” sweet potatoes are not very sweet at all, and are better used in dishes where they combine with other foods. A baked uncured sweet potato is a sad disappointment.

We stack our boxes of roots on pallets, and put wooden spacer sticks between boxes in each stack, to ensure airflow. We get quite good temperatures, but keeping humidity up is difficult for us. We cover the flats with newspaper to hold in some moisture. The best result seems to come from splashing water on the concrete floor several times each day. We use box fans to improve the airflow, and the basement already has some natural ventilation.

Ideal conditions for curing are 85-90°F (29-32°C), and 80-95% humidity for 4-7 days, with some airflow and ventilation. Curing takes longer if conditions are less than perfect. The length of the curing period also varies with the dryness of the soil just prior to harvest. We usually reckon on 10-14 days. . . . .

So – how did we do this year? Middle of the road, I’d say. Decent yields, but not a bumper crop – we still had empty boxes left over. The deer were regularly eating our vines until quite recently. Last year we had a dog to chase the deer off, but he met with a road accident. His replacement was old, and she just wanted to be a pet, so we had deer again. We used drip irrigation and biodegradable plastic mulch this year, and did a good job of weeding, so I put the lower yields down to deer damage.

Sweet potatoes on a plate.
Photo Brittany Lewis

2 thoughts on “Sweet potato harvests over the years”

  1. Because of field mice that nest underground and love both sweet & Peruvian potatoes (and beets, and cardoons, and chard roots!), I now grow sweet potatoes in 15 gal pots. 1 slip per pot. No need to weed except very early on, and it’s very easy to harvest. The yield is around 10-12 lbs per slip. closer to 10 this year, 12 last year. I still had rodent damage in one pot, but at least I am able to harvest enough for us and some extra to sell. The deer still manage to browse on any vine that snake through the fence.

  2. Thanks Sylvie, this is great info! 1 slip per 15 gal pot provides 10-12 lbs of sweet potatoes. This will especially help people with urban backyards, and those with field mice livestock farms!

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