Favorite posts of 2023: soil, winter, garlic, melons, beans, aphids

I’m hunkered down on this rainy January day, in expectation of high winds and lots of rain. I’ve battened down the hoophouse and I’m working to get a blog post out before the electric coop’s warning of possible extended power outages comes true!

One of many wheelbarrows full of compost we spread on our raised beds every year.
Photo Wren Vile

In the past year, my top post has been Soil Tests and High Phosphorus Levels. Clearly a worrying topic for those who like me, once though compost should be applied as generously as possible. I wrote this post in 2017, and it’s still an issue many people want to learn about.

The second highest number of views goes to Which Vegetables are Genetically Modified (GMOs)? Another worrying topic.

Ugly, but not dead yet! Tokyo bekana outdoors on January 7, 2024 after several cold nights, at least two at 20F, two at 18F, one each at 15F and 12F. Photo Pam Dawling

In third place  is Winter-Kill Temperatures of Cold-Hardy Vegetables 2021, and in fourth place is Winter-Kill Temperatures of Winter-Hardy Vegetables 2016. The 2018 version is in 8th place. My highest number of views in a single day came when Texas had that awful very cold weather, in mid-February 2021, and farmers and gardeners needed to find out in a hurry which crops to try to protect, which to give up on, and which needed no attention.

Fifth place goes to one of my many garlic posts: Garlic Scapes! Three weeks to bulb harvest. Scapes, the flower stems of hard-neck garlic, are an underappreciated auxiliary crop. They are not just a freebie extra, but removing them helps the garlic bulbs grow bigger. Pulling scapes would be worthwhile even if you didn’t use them.

Pulling garlic scapes.
Photo Wren Vile

Cover Crops in Summer is number 6 in popularity. Sunn hemp is joining our list of favorites, along with buckwheat and soy.

Root Cellar Potato Storage comes in at number 7. That’s from 2018. Root cellars haven’t changed!

Crates of potatoes in our root cellar.
Photo Nina Gentle

Harvesting Melons is next. I remember when I didn’t know what “full slip” meant. I found out and decided to make a post, reckoning many other people didn’t know either. That’s a heritage post! From 2012, the year I started this site.

Young bush bean plants.
Photo Pam Dawling

Green Beans All Summer is close behind. The post includes an unusual method of planting bean seed through plastic mulch, as well as early season and late season beans, and scheduling sowings for continuous harvests all summer.

Growing Flowers to Attract Aphid Predators rounds out the list. The post includes info and photos of many annual flowers we tried for our hoophouse. Most of them did not flower early enough to deal with the January and February aphids that have no ladybugs to eat them. We have established several perennial yarrow plants, and have hopes for those this year. We’ve also come to appreciate the value of bolted brassicas, such as tatsoi, turnips, and senposai. Their flowers do attract beneficials.

Leave a comment if your favorite didn’t make the top ten, or if there is a topic you’d like me to cover, or update, or give more details on.

Lettuce slideshow, Mother Earth News Fair, FaceBook Live, Top summer blogposts, upcoming events

We drove home seven hours from the Pennsylvania Mother Earth News Fair yesterday through the rain. The remnants of Hurricane Florence. We were among the lucky people. Earlier forecasts for Florence had the hurricane raging across central Virginia.

At the Fair, I gave two workshops: Fall and Winter Hoophouses and my new Lettuce Year Round, which you can view right here. Click the diagonal arrows icon to get a full screen view.

I had a bit too much material for a one-hour time-slot, so those of you who were there and felt disappointed at what I had to leave out, you can see it here.

While I as at the Fair I did a FaceBook Live Interview about gardening in hoophouses, with another author, Deborah Niemann. Look on Facebook for Deborah Niemann-Boehle or click the topic link above. She has several books: Raising Goats Naturally, Homegrown & Handmade, and Ecothrifty.

Shade cloth on a bed of lettuce in summer.
Photo Nina Gentle

Meanwhile, Mother Earth News tells me that my post 20 Tips for Success in Germinating Seeds in Hot Weather is in third place for most popular posts this summer.

The winner  An Effective and Non-Toxic Solution for Getting Rid of Yellow Jackets’ Nests by Miriam Landman got 43,328 views in 3 months!

Weeding rowcovered spinach in winter.
Photo Wren Vile

Looking at my own website statistics, I find that for this week, the most popular posts are

  1. Winter Kill Temperatures of Winter-Hardy Vegetables 2016
  2. Soil tests and high phosphorus levels
  3. How to deal with green potatoes
  4. .Winter-Kill Temperatures of Cold-Hardy Vegetables 2018
  5. Alliums for September

For all-time, the bias is naturally on posts that have been around longest,

  1. Garlic scapes! Three weeks to bulb harvest! Is most popular, followed closely by
  2. Winter Kill Temperatures of Winter-Hardy Vegetables 2016.
  3. How to deal with green potatoes is still #3.
  4.  The Complete Twin Oaks Garden Task List Month-by-Month,
  5. Harvesting Melons
  6. Book Review, Epic Tomatoes by Craig LeHoullier
  7. Wnter Hardiness
  8. Book Review: The Lean Farm by Ben Hartman and
  9. Setting out biodegradable plastic mulch by hand
Rolling biodegradable plastic mulch by hand
Photo Wren Vile

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I’ve updated my Events page again, now that the September- April  “Events Season” has hotted up. I’ve added in a couple of new ones and updated some others. Click the Events tab to find conferences and fairs near you, and be sure to come and introduce yourself!

Ira Wallace of Southern Exposure Seed Exchange, at the Heritage Harvest Festival Tomato Tasting.
Photo courtesy of Monticello

The Heritage Harvest Festival  is September 21-22 Monticello, near Charlottesville, Virginia

I’m giving a Premium Workshop on Friday Sept 21, 3-4 pm Classroom 7. Click the link HERE to book for that.

Feeding the Soil

In this workshop I will introduce ways to grow and maintain healthy soils: how to develop a permanent crop rotation in seven steps, and why your soil will benefit from this; how to choose appropriate cover crops; how to make compost and how to benefit from using organic mulches to feed the soil. Handouts.

Book-signing Friday 4.15 – 4.45 pm.

On Saturday there are events all day from 10am to 5pm. $26 general admission.

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Saturday September 29, 2018  Allegheny Mountain Institute Farm at Augusta Health,  Fishersville, VA 22939. 9 am – noon

I’m giving a two-hour Class on Season Extension, followed by one-hour Q&A teaching tour of the hoophouse and greenhouse.