Report from Mother Earth News Fair, and more to look forward to

<div style=”margin-bottom:5px”> <strong> <a href=”https://www.slideshare.net/SustainableMarketFarming/coldhardy-winter-vegetables-pam-dawling-2013″ title=”Cold-hardy winter vegetables – Pam Dawling 2013″ target=”_blank”>Cold-hardy winter vegetables – Pam Dawling 2013</a> </strong> from <strong><a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/SustainableMarketFarming” target=”_blank”>Pam Dawling</a></strong> </div>

While I was checking SlideShare.net for my slideshows, to re-post my Cold-hardy Winter Vegetables one, I found this lovely one, from Alison and Paul Weidiger, two of my gardening gurus. They farm in Kentucky, which is the same winter-hardiness zone as us (zone 7) and the same latitude (38N).

<div style=”margin-bottom:5px”> <strong> <a href=”https://www.slideshare.net/awiediger/fall-and-winter-production-presentation” title=”Fall And Winter Production” target=”_blank”>Fall And Winter Production</a> </strong> from <strong><a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/awiediger” target=”_blank”>awiediger</a></strong> </div>

Alison and Paul will be presenters at the Virginia Biofarming Conference Jan 31 – Feb 1, 2014 in Richmond, VA at the Doubletree by Hilton HotelThey will give two workshops Growing Cool Season Vegetable Crops in High Tunnels  and  Greenhouse Herb and Transplant Production for Profit. There’s a great line-up of speakers including Mark Cain (another grower I much admire) on Cut Flowers, Harvey Ussery, The Modern Homestead,  the $43,560 Project by Clif Slade and our dear friend  Ira Wallace, of Southern Exposure Seed Exchange on How to Germinate Seeds Year-Round.

Also some speakers I haven’t met before, who sound really good: Successful Management of a Diversified Organic Farm by Stacy Brenner and John Bliss, of Broadturn FarmProfitable Vegetable Farming on 1.5 Acres: BioIntensive Market Garden  by Jean-Martin Fortier, of Les Jardins de la Grelinette, and Ray Archuleta, Conservation Agronomist, NRCS .and several more. See the VABF website for more details.

I left for the Mother Earth News Fair in PA on Thursday, and got home on Monday. It was a huge event! Over 240 workshops at 14 different locations, some indoor stages, some outdoors. Saturday was rainy, Sunday cold. I think it’s the first time I’ve given a presentation while wearing my jacket. but these Fair-goers are a hardy lot. The tent was packed. As well as the presentations, there were almost 400 booths with exhibitors, vendors and demonstrations, and the large MEN Bookstore, where I did book-signing on Sunday after my presentation.

Here’s a lovely piece of feedback I got: “I thought your presentation was excellent – best I went to. – you seem to really love your vocation and your information was all practical with no trite filler (like some). Well done.”

I also (at last, after a few years of emailing), had the pleasure of meeting my editor, Ingrid Witvoet, and my marketing person, Sara Reeves, from New Society Publishers. At the NSP authors’ reception, I got the chance to talk with other writers, comparing our experiences.

I joined the MEN Blog Squad at a lunch meeting, and signed up to also blog for them. Don’t worry, I won’t close this one down any time soon.

I hope to go to the Asheville, NC MEN Fair April 12-13 2014. I might need a new slideshow – so many of mine are intended for winter and fall conference audiences.

And now, back at home, fixing irrigation systems, sowing seeds for winter hoophouse crops and unpacking my cold weather clothes. there has been a decided shift in temperature in the past few weeks. Fall is beautiful here.

Fall spiderweb photo from Ezra's blog ObserVA
Fall spiderweb photo from Ezra’s blog ObserVA

On the radio

The hoophouse winter crops are an important part of feeding ourselves year-round
The hoophouse winter crops are an important part of feeding ourselves year-round

What pictures can I give you of a radio interview? On NPR they always say the pictures are better on the radio, so you might have to use your imaginations.

A while back I was interviewed by Patricia Stansbury (also known as Sunny Gardener) of Lightly on the Ground Radio, Here’s Sunny Gardener’s description of her program:

“Lightly on the Ground is how we travel when go consciously. It’s how we dance when we really dance. The wealth of information gathered while living this life becomes wisdom only if used and shared. Lightly on the Ground Radio is a way to use and share life’s wisdom by casting light into shadowed corners of our culture. The show emphasizes how our daily choices affect how we live and how others on this tiny planet live.  The advice to “live simply that others might simply live” informs life daily as long as some semblance of consciousness is maintained. This requires looking at local issues as part of a larger picture. Our daily choices in food, clothing, activities, transportation, childbearing, values, and association make up a fabric that can either be shabby and worn to bits or woven tightly and mended when needed.  Lightly on the Ground Radio imparts information through news reporting and story telling, conversations with those who know the subject; and commentary to bring personal perspectives on issues and events.”

Lightly on the Ground is a program on Richmond’s Independent Radio WRIR. 

I talked about How to Feed 100 People Year ‘round from the Garden, and about my book Sustainable Market Farming “which addresses the topic splendidly” as Sunny Gardener wrote.  You can listen to the podcast of my interview herehttp://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/69076 

 Radio4All.net